Flames or bouquets?

The flame vase recently acquired is wreathed with a faience bouquet, whereas the one in the Museum of Ceramics would previously have been topped with a flame. What can we deduce? The two flames held by the Museum obviously constitute the ideal crest for these vases. Although their bases have been worn down at some point in the past, they appear to correspond perfectly to the embouchure of each vase. Was it decided at some point, during the transformation into fountains for example, to replace the blue and red flames with newly-created bouquets? Or, are the faience bouquets contemporary to the flames, thus constituting a beautiful decorative alternative, planned at the very outset of the creation of the vases? This last hypothesis, however, raises several problems: the bouquet from the Rouen Museum is much too big - it is out of proportion. and crushes the piece. It seems highly unlikely that it crowned this vase. Besides, unlike the vases themselves, the inside of the bouquet is not enamelled. This difference in the technical process is surprising if the bouquet is contemporary to the vases. So would it have been made afterwards? The investigation is under way...